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Author Topic: Finally A Reasonable Comparison  (Read 622 times)
borispmchan
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« on: May 27, 2013, 05:32:33 PM »

This a comment for this page on the website
Last time I complained about the unfair advantage given by the NEX7 in sharpness score between the Lumix G ultra-wide angle and NEX ultra-wide angle, and this time you've addressed that issue. Great.
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DtEW
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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2013, 05:38:22 AM »

<div id="linkdxomark">This a comment for <a href="http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Lenses/Camera-Lens-Database/Sony/Sony-E-20mm-F28">this page on the website</a></div>Last time I complained about the unfair advantage given by the NEX7 in sharpness score between the Lumix G ultra-wide angle and NEX ultra-wide angle, and this time you've addressed that issue. Great.

What in the world are you talking about?  Nothing m43 was at all referenced in this article, nor was any compensation made for sensor differences.  Are you so bent on trying to take pride in m43 optics that you are spinning one middling result from a competing system's lens into some sort of greater revelation that past results are now somehow irrelevant or flawed?

Newsflash:  DXOMark tests lenses from widely disparate systems with vastly varying pixel counts and sensor sizes.  They have an established protocol and won't stray from it just so you can feel that your holy lenses remain holy.

The SEL20F28 is a compromise lens derived from a worse-compromised lens, the SEL16F28.  It was always about compactness, and never about achieving high optical standards.  Other NEX lenses, as DXOMark has shown, can be much better.
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borispmchan
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2013, 06:38:38 AM »

<div id="linkdxomark">This a comment for <a href="http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Lenses/Camera-Lens-Database/Sony/Sony-E-20mm-F28">this page on the website</a></div>Last time I complained about the unfair advantage given by the NEX7 in sharpness score between the Lumix G ultra-wide angle and NEX ultra-wide angle, and this time you've addressed that issue. Great.

What in the world are you talking about?  Nothing m43 was at all referenced in this article, nor was any compensation made for sensor differences.  Are you so bent on trying to take pride in m43 optics that you are spinning one middling result from a competing system's lens into some sort of greater revelation that past results are now somehow irrelevant or flawed?

Newsflash:  DXOMark tests lenses from widely disparate systems with vastly varying pixel counts and sensor sizes.  They have an established protocol and won't stray from it just so you can feel that your holy lenses remain holy.

The SEL20F28 is a compromise lens derived from a worse-compromised lens, the SEL16F28.  It was always about compactness, and never about achieving high optical standards.  Other NEX lenses, as DXOMark has shown, can be much better.

Below is the URL of the DXOMark comparison I've mentioned.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Publications/DxOMark-Reviews/Sony-E-35mm-f1.8-and-Sony-E-10-18mm-f4-A-Very-Good-Standard-and-a-Wide-Zoom

Even writer addressed the unfair advantage the NEX7 sensor provides to the sharpness score, I cannot see how my comment was biased.

Sony did improve their pancake lens design with this 20mm F2.8 over the old 16mm F2.8, but most of the E-mount lenses are still mediocre in terms of sharpness with an exception of the Zeiss 24mm, which I admit is a pretty decent lens.
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