Forum

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wide Angle Comparison  (Read 2324 times)
mackguyver
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« on: January 20, 2012, 05:21:29 PM »

This a comment for this page on the website
It seems strange that you would do the two 3-lens comparisons with a mix of crop and full-frame sensors.  The results for these comparisons are much different when you select 3 crop sensors.
Logged
jeh241
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2012, 06:21:02 PM »

I agree.

It ruins the comparison. In the Nikon Lineup you have a D3000 selected in comparison to the D3x, seriously? But wait! There's a problem there... you can't select the D3000 for that lens, but it is showing the D7000 score anyway. What's up with that??

The scores are skewed by the fact that you're comparing a crop sensor to a full frame sensor. If you select these lens and compare them on the same body the scores are a bit different. A great example is on the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR. You stick that on a crop sensor and the "Strong vignetting" becomes less problematic than the Tokina on the same body. If you put both of those lenses on the D3x (that the Nikon was installed on) The Tokina would be crap (considering it's a DX lens), not only would there be vignetting, at the widest zoom level you'd start to get black edges.

So what the heck you guys? I mean, I love Tokina, but this test is a bit flawed, and despite coming to what would have been the right conclusion anyway, the sloppy comparison invalidate that conclusion.
Logged
axel
Administrator
Newbie
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2012, 07:24:08 PM »

Hi,

You are completely right. We corrected it. Thanks for pointing it out.

And, as you noted, the conclusion stays the same, the Tokina 12-24mm are very good lenses.

We also added a link for the comparison between the Sigmas and respectively the Canon and Nikon on full frame cameras. Unfortunately without the Tokinas, as they are APS-C only lenses.

Axel
Logged
jeh241
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2012, 07:31:35 PM »

Hey Axel,

Thanks for the corrections! I didn't mean to come across to harsh, especially for my first time posting around here, but I'm glad to see you guys made the appropriate adjustments.

I've always come to Dx0Mark for the cold hard facts and it has taught me a lot about the technical details behind my digital camera and in return has helped me maximize the performance of my gear.
Logged
axel
Administrator
Newbie
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2012, 07:49:53 PM »

You're welcome.
It's great to see that we have awesome readers like you who can point out such mistakes.
Have a great day,

Axel
Logged
mackguyver
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2012, 08:48:01 PM »

Thanks, Axel, and the work you guys do is much appreciated!  I'm a longtime user of DxO Optics Pro and the DxOMark data really helps me get the most out of my lenses.  For example, when I use my Sigma 12-24 II on my 5DMkII (a flawed lens but great for my ultra-wide landscapes), I know that f/11 is the optimal aperture at 12mm and that allows me to get the best RAW capture that will ultimately give me the best output from DxO Optics Pro. 

Your database is a goldmine and helps me pick out the perfect lenses for each shoot based on what I'm shooting.  It also gives me information on the best settings and what settings will most compromise my shots, particularly with zooms in terms of focal length/aperture. 
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: